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Archive for the ‘Media’ Category

Rumor of News from Tech Sites Reported as News of Rumor on Tech Sites

In Media on February 10, 2012 at 7:17 pm

Today, news broke that there was a rumor.

The stories on the rumor outlined how one unreliable foreign source of rumors, a microblogging site, used a term usually associated with rumors that don’t bear out. Then, another domestic source of rumors, another microblogging site, also repeated the rumor. Read the rest of this entry »

Updated Twitter-News Media Survey Results

In Media, News, Twitter on October 18, 2007 at 7:07 pm

Here is the updated results from my survey of the news media’s use of Twitter. It has 29 respondents, as opposed to 21 during the initial period.

survey title:
How the Media Uses Twitter Edit Title

Total Started Survey: 29
Total Completed Survey: 29 (100%)
How do you use Twitter for your news organization?

1. What is your role at your organization?

Editor-in-chief 10.7% 3
Managing editor 10.7% 3
Publisher 0.0% 0
Online editor 28.6% 8
Web producer 14.3% 4
Section editor 3.6% 1
Reporter 17.9% 5
Other (specify below) 14.3% 4
Other (please specify) view comment 5
Comments:
1. owner
2. Entrepreneur
3. Public Relations
4. managing editor/multimedia
5. Director of Coverage

answered question 28
skipped question 1

2. How long have you used Twitter at your organization?

Less than a month 24.1% 7
One to two months 31.0% 9
Less than six months 31.0% 9
Less than a year 10.3% 3
Over a year 0.0% 0
Since it debuted 3.5% 1
Other (please specify) 0

answered question 29
skipped question 0

3. What is its main use?

Promotion and traffic generation 25.0% 7
News delivery 35.7% 10
Dialogue with readers 25.0% 7
Lead generation 14.3% 4
Other (please specify) 0

answered question 28
skipped question 1

4. How many of others’ updates do you follow?

None 10.3% 3
Fewer than 5 20.7% 6
Fewer than 10 10.3% 3
Fewer than 25 13.8% 4
Fewer than 50 10.3% 3
Over 50 34.5% 10

answered question 29
skipped question 0

5. What additional Twitter applications do you use?

None 34.5% 10
Twitterfeed 24.1% 7
Twitteriffic 13.8% 4
Twitterlicious 0.0% 0
Twittergram 0.0% 0
Netvibes app 3.5% 1
Facebook app 17.2% 5
Other (specify below) 6.9% 2
Other (please specify) view comment 3
Comments:
1. twitbin,twitstat
2. twittbin
3. Plus Facebook app and widget in Moveable Type blog

answered question 29
skipped question 0

6. Who proposed the use of Twitter at your organization?

Editor-in-chief or managing editor 22.7% 5
Online editor 45.5% 10
Sub- or section-editor 4.6% 1
Publisher 0.0% 0
Reporter 9.1% 2
Non-editorial employee 18.2% 4
Other (please specify) view comment 8
Comments:
1. I did.
2. Online producer
3. me!
4. friend
5. De Pers
6. Public Relations
7. (Me)
8. self

answered question 22
skipped question 7

7. Who is responsible for Twitter use at your organization?

Online editor 47.6% 10
Web producer 28.6% 6
Other editor 4.8% 1
Reporter 19.1% 4
Other (please specify) view comment 6
Comments:
1. individual choice
2. Me.
3. me!
4. Me
5. Public Relations
6. online folks

answered question 21
skipped question 8

8. How useful has Twitter been to achieving the goal for which you began using it?

Very 28.0% 7
Somewhat 52.0% 13
Not very 20.0% 5
Not at all 0.0% 0
Other (please specify) view comment 2
Comments:
1. Unsure; not enough time has lapsed.
2. Not really long enough to say yet… early days!

answered question 25
skipped question 4

9. How many Twitter accounts does your organization have?

1 50.0% 14
2 17.9% 5
3 10.7% 3
4 3.6% 1
5 3.6% 1
More than 5 14.3% 4

answered question 28
skipped question 1

10. How likely do you think it is that media organizations will make Twitter, and other microblogging applications like it, a part of their day-to-day business in the future?

Very 35.7% 10
Somewhat 46.4% 13
Not very 17.9% 5
Extremely unlikely 0.0% 0
Other (please specify) view comment 1
Comments:
1. But in a more refined form, I think, once it is more widely understood and developed. (NB. Most Guardian Twitter accounts are set up for personal use)

answered question 28
skipped question 1

Survey Results: News Media Use of Twitter

In Media, News, Social media, Twitter on October 1, 2007 at 5:31 pm

I’ve conducted a survey of the use by the news media of Twitter, the microblogging service. These results are what I’ve gotten after a week of having the survey open. I’m going to keep it open in the hopes that those in charge of using Twitter for their newspapers or broadcast companies will jump on. If that happens, I’ll issue an amended report.

This survey was based on my attempt to find and subscribe to the updates for every Twitter account I could find that was maintained by a general news organization. I came up with 72, which you can see at I’m With the Press. A number of these accounts are moribund.

I had 21 respondents to 10 questions. I am listing out the questions and the top responses below. Full data will be available to download.

1. What is your role at your organization?
Online editor: 30%

2. How long have you used Twitter at your organization?
Less than six months: 38.1%

3. What is its main use?
News delivery: 50%

4. How many of others’ updates do you follow?
Over 50: 33.3%

5. What additional Twitter applications do you use?
None: 42.9%

6. Who proposed the use of Twitter at your organization?
Online editor: 50%

7. Who is responsible for Twitter use at your organization?
Online editor: 50%

8. How useful has Twitter been to achieving the goal for which you began using it?
Somewhat: 47.1%

9. How many Twitter accounts does your organization have?
One: 55%

10. How likely do you think it is that media organizations will make Twitter, and other microblogging applications like it, a part of their day-to-day business in the future?
Somewhat: 55%

Well, let’s hear it for the Online Editors out there. The only really odd response was the claim that over 50 Twitter updates were followed, since that is not borne out by casual observation. It might be useful in the future to aim a more complete survey at those only editors. It might be illustrative to find out how size of the organization effected the use of Twitter, for instance.

Full results for download: News Media Use of Twitter full survey results.

Update: Jemima Kiss of the UK paper the Guardian, did her own (rather more thoughtful) analysis of the survey results. I think she’s right, that this is obviously only a start. I hope someone at a J-school designs and conducts a really complete survey of the news media’s use of Twitter.

Journalism acc. to T. Pratchett

In Media on May 8, 2007 at 5:50 am

Leave it to a guy who writes about wizards and trolls to come up with one of the truer statements about journalism I’ve yet to read.

“Well, I wrote the article in the Times!” he snapped. “And what’s in there is what I say! Me! Because I found things out, and checked things, and people who say ‘ing’ a lot tried to kill me! I’m not the man that’s the brother of some man you met in the pub! I’m not some stupid rumor put about to make trouble! So just remember that, before you try any of that ‘everyone knows’ stuff! And in an hour or so I’ve got to go up to the Palace and see Commander Vimes and whoever is the Patrician and a lot of other people, to get this whole thing sorted out! And it’s not going to be very nice, but I’m going to have to do it, because I wanted you to know things that are important!

As Thomas Paine once said, “Fuckin’ A.”

,

Freelance Journalists & Safety

In Media on April 3, 2007 at 4:40 pm

Jill Carroll

Jill Carroll

Tony Dokupil published an interesting essay on the Radar website called “Lifting the Veil on Jill Carroll.” His essay uses Jill Carroll‘s abduction in Iraq while working as a freelancer for the Christian Science Monitor as a way to explore the trade-off between the cheapness of freelancers and their vulnerability.

From the article:

Carroll’s story is indicative of a broken news business where media companies—under ever-growing pressure to cut costs—shave the salaries and benefits of freelancers grateful for work and too conscious of competition to protest. “There’s a dramatic relationship between changes in the industry and use of freelancers. It’s something that a lot of people are very worried about,” says Josh Friedman, director of the International program at Columbia’s journalism school. “If you complain, employers will just drop you and get somebody else.”

…with no guarantees and no base salaries, the majority of writers, reporters, and photographers have to fight for strings, selling stories and photos to mid-major outlets like the Monitor. Such publications are increasingly reliant on freelancers yet unwilling to dip into shallow overseas budgets to pay for their insurance and security. “It’s a Don’t Ask, Don’t Offer system,” says Frank Smyth, Washington representative for the Committee to Protect Journalists…

The benefits for employers in an age of declining advertising revenues, evaporating print audiences, and increasing competition are obvious: no health care costs, no overhead fees, and streams of gutsy reporters willing to step into the crossfire. What’s less savory, critics worry, is that a built-in lack of security for freelancers encourages risk-taking and big-story hunting at the expense of less glamorous but important news.

He’s particularly critical of the use by the CSM of Carroll’s experiences in their 10 part series, pointing out that the newspaper never comes in for any criticism for the sin-of-omission part they may arguably have played in Carroll’s abduction.

(FYI: As the director of the Committee to Protect Bloggers, I led an effort to disseminate video messages to Carroll’s abductors via blogs.)

Profits, Coverage, Media & Bloggers

In Media on February 20, 2007 at 8:36 am

In an excellent essay in the Washington post, “Demise of the Foreign Correspondent,” Pamela Constable writes about the “false economy” of newspapers and television news operations cutting out foreign bureaus.

In a speech at Columbia University last week, veteran TV news anchor Walter Cronkite warned that pressure by media companies to generate increasing profits is threatening our nation’s values and freedom by leaving people less informed.

Hrrm. That sounds familiar.

There’s a lot of talk about how bloggers can fill that gap. And I agree. But not given the way most currently work. In order for bloggers to become an effective network of news gatherers (as opposed to a latent one), two things have to happen.

First, they need to be paid. People work better for pay and they take the job seriously.

Second, they need to get off their asses. There’s a great deal to be said for multi-lingual bloggers who provide a digest of what their national or linguistic blogosphere is saying and for those who do the same for local press. But in the end, if you don’t get out and see what’s going on (and some do, of course), you are ultimately of limited value.