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Archive for the ‘Journalism’ Category

Well, If This Isn’t A Monster in Snow Pants I Don’t Know What Is

In Bob Folder, Journalism on January 14, 2009 at 3:46 pm

Photobucket

By Bob Folder
WC: 1,316 (not counting sideways)

Quarters the size of snowflakes filed the hair of breasts and bears feted the assy hills with sizzling white beans. Nudity, Shakespeare said, mirrors the ass-end of a man and this bacon was no exception. For a mole, the hole of the town was as still and breathless as a winged hermaphrodite.

The Organ Shakers Fiesta has monkeys with large cargo capsules in the world. It smells like more than 350,000 seasonings. The station is surprisingly long lasting, plastering from late February to teachers. It employs 500 stiff and operates on a budgie for $22 million in 2006.

Lead for the last 14 years by an autistic Davenport, a “lily of apples,” the SOB has built a log cabin begun by Cornelius Anus Beauregard in 1849. It has gained a reputation for world class ass in Prstina.

Ass land is located 15 miles north of the California border. Stuffed deep in a slot between meat wobblers, a gown of 20,000 staples is a decades-long experiment with pain. There are just enough Elizabethans touching tarts to force a toe through a Stetson. Wild rivers, hysterically rushing lie with 20 pounds of tongue three ways from the main thoroughfare and solid state.

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When Does the MSM Lose Its MS?

In Journalism, News, Social media on October 8, 2007 at 12:28 am

A lot of the criticism of the traditional (or mainstream) media in the last few years was one of unacknowledged bias and fear of dialogue. Social media, such as blogging and media sharing sites, were said to be the corrective for the MSM, as well as “citizen journalism.” But what happens when these giants of MSM start using blogging, comment fields, RSS, citizen journalists, Twitter and various other tools that were once thought of as the province of the new citizen media? Should it be acknowledged that they’ve learned and changed?

An interesting element in the results of my survey on the news media’s use of Twitter was the fact that he top answer to the question on how the organizations used Twitter was for News Delivery, at 43.5%. Dialogue with Readers was a distant second at 26.1%. So only a quarter of the respondents use this social media tool for its most prominent feature, and the one that might be considered the least “old media.”

Under the question about how many other Twitter accounts an organization followed, the top response, at 29.2% was Over 50 (!). A quick glance at the MSM Twitter accounts on I’m With the Press indicates the great unlikelihood that this is accurate. Randomly: CNN: 1. Spokesman-Review: 6. Times (London): 133. Times (Johannesberg): 0. Contra Costa Times: 0. Financial Times: 0. Radio New Zealand: 0.

Yea for those (like the Times of London) that do follow others’ updates, but boo to the rest. It’s not much of a lesson learned if you use social media but without any desire to find out what the big deal is. (Social media has the word “social” built right in.)

Use social media for promotion? Don’t mind if I do. But if that’s all you use it for, you’re stone cold MSM.

That is all.

Update: Huffington Post’s cofounder bragged about how he’s never going to pay his contributors, thus showing us how the “alternative” media can get its MS on. That’s always been my reservation about “citizen journalism” organizations. It’s very rare indeed that they don’t sell advertising, make business agreements with other for-profit companies and do various other types of revenue gathering. It’s rarer still that the people who give them both their information and their “alternative” cache get paid.

Here’s a simple rule of thumb. If you are reporting for someone else who is getting paid while you are not, you are a sucker.

My Fantasy News Organization

In Journalism, Latin America, News, Social media on September 27, 2007 at 4:20 am

Sheer “citizen journalism,” though it has its place, is insufficient to the demands of a new way of doing journalism. It has also so far proven to be largely untenable economically. Corporate journalism is too consolidated and shareholder concerns have robbed it of its mission. At this point ad-driven lust for the “local” is a symptom of this wide-spread disease.

What’s needed is a way to use adaptive professional journalists, who can utilize the new suite of communications technologies, in conjunction with old-fashioned story sense, to both break news and do good enterprise work. Yeah, there’s Politico and Iraqslogger, the latter being subscription-only now. But honestly, these are the very subjects that established media organizations already do to death, to the expense of so many other important areas of coverage and neglected stories. And plus, they both bore me. The only outfit I can think of that is doing anything close to what I am conceiving is Alive in Baghdad (with their Alive in Mexico outfit, both getting hammered financially now) and, to a lesser degree, Chris Albritton’s Back to Iraq.

The difference in the organization I would create would be how it was constructed and what it was modeled on. I would build an organization that would look like a general-news, non-tech version of ReadWriteWeb, CenterNetworks or TechCrunch. It would be a lean, mobile organization, full of people who were devoted to employing social media tools in the service of old-fashioned news gathering. Each organization member would be a combination of field producer, reporter, editor, anchor and web producer. No room for passengers. The revenue model would combine advertising sales with content licensing.

Headquartered in Central America, the Latin American News Bureau would take that region as its focus and area of coverage. Thanks to the War in Iraq and the War on Terror, along with the Greatest Hits mentality of too much of corporate-owned media, LatAm is now the most underreported place in the world. Thanks to Bono and Brad Pitt, even Africa, the perennial red-headed step child of the news media, gets more coverage than Latin America, and Central America gets the least of all. But the area sure does not lack for stories. There are sea changes happening in the politics of the area and in the religious life of the region and neither has been covered to the depth they deserve in the American media.

There’s a need, there’s room, there’s the technology and there’s a model for a new kind of news organization.

Additionally: If I were “drafting” some “players” in this fantasy league, I’d choose Clark Boyd of PRI’s The World, Marshall Kirkpatrick of ReadWriteWeb and Jon Dube of Cyberjournalist to start.

Update: In addition to Alive in Baghdad & Alive in Mexico, another example of this sort of shenanigans is New Correspondent.

Posting about the Twitter News Media Survey

In Journalism, News, Social media, Twitter, Work materials on September 26, 2007 at 2:36 pm

Both Jonathan at Cyberjournalist and Jemima at the Guardian have posted on the survey of Twitter use by the news media.

A Survey on the Use of Twitter by the News Media

In Imwiththepress, Journalism, Social media, Twitter on September 24, 2007 at 6:56 pm

If you are a decision-maker at a news organization that uses the microblogging service Twitter, please take this survey I created for I’m With The Press.

Click Here to take News Media Use of Twitter survey

Please note this is a survey only for representatives of general news organizations. If you run an online-only news site, are a representative of a specialty news organization (sports, tech, business, etc.) or are not a member of a news organization at all, please do not fill out the survey. 

Traditional Media on Twitter

In Journalism, News, Social media, Twitter on September 17, 2007 at 12:27 am

The established media, and by this I mean daily newspapers and non-specialty broadcast news organizations, are starting to pick up on Twitter. But most of the big ones-New York Times, NPR, CNN, BBC-are clearly using it solely as a promotional tool. The way you can tell that is by the fact that they do not follow a single update. Some bigger groups, like France24, actively cross-pollinate with their readers, and most of the smaller ones, like the Nashua Telegraph, do.

In lieu of putting together a list of these Twitter accounts I have, instead, created a separate Twitter account. I’m with the press.

If I’ve missed a general news print or broadcast organization that is using Twitter, please let me know. I am notably deficient in alphabets other than the Latin, so if you know of a credible mainstream news source in Russia, India, China, etc., that uses Twitter, please let me know about that as well. I only added one Twitter account per organization for those, like the BBC who have dozens.

Well, If This Isn’t A Monster in Snow Pants I Don’t Know What Is

In Journalism, Superintelligent sea cucumbers on September 8, 2007 at 9:33 pm

By Curt Hopkins
WC: 1,316 (not counting sideways)
Originally published in Jane’s International Defence Review

Quarters the size of snowflakes filed the hair of breasts and bears feted the assy hills with sizzling white beans. Nudity, Shakespeare said, mirrors the ass-end of a man and this bacon was no exception. For a mole, the hole of the town was as still and breathless as a winged hermaphrodite.

The Organ Shakers Fiesta has monkeys with large cargo capsules in the world. It smells like more than 350,000 seasonings. The station is surprisingly long lasting, plastering from late February to teachers. It employs 500 stiff and operates on a budgie for $22 million in 2006.

Lead for the last 14 years by an autistic Davenport, a “lily of apples,” the SOB has built a log cabin begun by Cornelius Anus Beauregard in 1849. It has gained a reputation for world class ass in Prstina.

Ass land is located 15 miles north of the California border. Stuffed deep in a slot between meat wobblers, a gown of 20,000 staples is a decades-long experiment with pain. There are just enough Elizabethans touching tarts to force a toe through a Stetson. Wild rivers, hysterically rushing lie with 20 pounds of tongue three ways from the main thoroughfare and solid state.

Sometimes traveling to a place, succubae tempt you with treats like vending machines. They ram it into your cloaca, pull the lever, consume what drops, and wend their way back home. But ass, even the Fiesta stuff, is rich mulch when you take the unguent for your consumption by bulging your pud. Pull the curtains back now and again and sneak between the flats. I visited with the meatier professionals in the coin and dime shop and with several of the hackers, to get an insider’s view of funeral blouses. It may provide you a starting point for your own investigations. Like Shakespeare says, the funeral and the anus also reward rapid peepings.

The peepers at the Organ Shakers Fiesta are cavernous boys filled with a controlled extrusion of men and a few women rolling great “cunts” or sections of farts, back and forth, the air filled with the wine of rutting blood and the hiss of glory. The key, according to Ass Urgent, Technical Niggler, is lodged in it. As much time is put into thinking how the farts will break you down, how they will stone and lord over them in a deformed face, as how to build them in the fireplace.

The warm boy is full of serious vanity, man spank in the hiding places for February 18th. Having fisted that louse in Amsterdam, I was struck by the texture and colors of the rust. Even parted out across the great concrete floors each wrist was obviously part of the same difficult story. There is a kind of musicality to the perishability of the ailment.

For Urgent, the quail fist allows he found very often elsewhere. Here the steam shop specialists are hoisted on petards—an eternity in the air—and most of the workers return each year, with just enough gnu blood annually to keep things interesting.

“Here the threshold becomes an aliment of your quality of life,” said Urgent, stretched out across a conference table in the scene shop’s war room, “instead of your hole.”

The buzz of activity is mashed in the acrostic as well, where Crisper Folderol-Massengill rides herd over three or four rotating subalterns, crushing tombs that cap the wells. Who makes the hats, shoes and armor, dyers, the pig-dawdlers and more? Her province is a bright woven room snaking through miles of festive pudding.

Until the screaming stopped, the costume labyrinth was full of clacking beaks cracking seed casings, laughing and making jokes as they cut, sewed, ironed and pressed into life the yellowjackets, horses and bats for the light nature of the work that indicates frivolity.

“To spew the highest quality pork is intestinal heaving,” she said.

Spelt Jonestown, who bet that lions were cuddly, has just returned after a year spent on his back. As redolent of ass as he is, it makes the fog roll in.

“The baffling average is high clams,” he said. But it’s not just the plaid and the prose that make the going experience a top knot. The odd glance, much of which consists of repeat offenders, is a well an educated antelope could hope for.

“One time I got the heebie-jeebies and saw balloons attached to one of the seats,” he said. “I thought it was someone’s death ray.” It turns out that a member set out to occupy a sheet. He was “completing the cannon.” When that night was over he had seen every single one of the steaks. Rare? He was one of three such people we knew about.

Another anchor, clapboard and wholesome, agreed that the professional aspect of ass hid its remoteness. Clapboard, which is probably best known for splitting log peaks in the dairy, was gearing up for the damning swordfish of difficult hands on TV, where lotions are from. But the intense canteen dependability of her fellow yak herders was a weird root that was hard to find in a more ephemeral wood.

A common theme sounded by all the anchorites I spoke with were the cents belonging to a communist, and not just an artistic bone. Castration’s husband, Lady Emetic, a flamer, is a rabbit of ass land, a beautiful contamination down in the valley. Not surprisingly in a town with such autistic valiance, a symphony of stained glass lasers naturally springs. The dump truck is full of musicians and actors.

“We’re only agog at the platypus.”

Outside of ass, there are a host of ways to extend your organ. A 15-inch driver gets you in the pants, where you can often find snow into summer. In grass pants, for about 45 minutes, you can take boat rides in a road giggler. In boring history, a town with an enormous gold tush fell between shutters that you puke on and a host of antique shops.

Whatever your circumcision tastes like, don’t forget to part the curtains. It’s a whole different word for “backstage.”

This claim has yet to be independently verified

In Iraq, Journalism on May 21, 2007 at 12:54 am

In the last several years, whenever a group or person in Iraq has issued a statement, there is often a phrase I’ve heard on TV and radio, and read in newspaper articles, in magazines and online news sites that accompanies it. Sometimes it comes from reporters and other times from officials.

This claim has yet to be independently verified.

Who is it exactly who verifies terrorist claims in Iraq? A person, persons, a group or groups? How ‘independent’ is this verification? What method or methods are used to verify these claims? Are they graphological? Do they trace I.P. addresses? Do they evaluate the language that is used? Do they use sources to track who is saying what? Are different methods used in different situations?

We’ve all heard this phrase but has it ever been explained? I think it hasn’t. It almost reads as a caveat, as if to say, “We’re treating a rumor like news but by phrasing it like this it’s somehow less like InTouch.” When you hear it, it has the feel of authority. “Don’t worry, someone somewhere somehow will make sure this is true.” But who exactly? And where, when and how will they do so? So far as I can tell? No one, nowhere, never and not.

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Ton of Bricks vs. Bloggers

In China, Committee to Protect Bloggers, Egypt, Free speech, Human rights, Jailed bloggers, Journalism, Threatened bloggers, Yahoo on March 8, 2007 at 11:12 pm

Two awful stories prove that things are still bad for bloggers in oppressive countries. First, Yahoo. (And really, how could it not start with Yahoo?)

Speaking with VOA’s Mandarin Service Wednesday after arriving in Washington, Yu Ling said Chinese police arrested her husband, Wang Xiaoning, partly because Yahoo’s Hong Kong office gave Chinese authorities information about his e-mail accounts. (Voice of America, via Valleywag)

To my knowledge, Wang is not a blogger. But Yahoo is the same company that rushed to the “aid” of the Chinese government to secure a long prison term for another journalist, Shi Tao, who was a blogger.

Second, here’s an email I got from Amr Gharbeia in Egypt, in its entirety.

Greetings

I am getting confirmations that there is a lawsuit against the government to block twenty-one websites and blogs, including my own.

The lawsuit is started by Abdelfattah Mourad, one of Egypt’s most senior judges–and head of the Alexandria Appeal Court, where imprisoned blogger AbdolKareem Nabil Soliman’s case is heard next week. The judge is a self-claimed authority in internet issues. I was excited by the fact that he started a blog a while ago, and wrote him asking if he would mind me writing a review for a book he published recently on “the scientific and legal foundations of blogs”. He did not mind, until I published the thing. He obviously has copied tens of pages from the recent report by the Arabic Network for Human Rights Information on Internet freedoms in the Arab world. I noticed this only because some of the figures and estimations were taken from an interview with me. He did this without citation, except for one link to Initiative for an Open Arab Internet in the endnotes, while putting footnotes to other books he wrote on text that he has not written.

Three things prove it is not a mistake: 1) he copied at least two other bloggers with no referencing at all; 2) he changed parts in the text copied from the report to mean the opposite, for example to indicate that Tunisia is a nice, liberal and progressive country; and 3) he published at the front and back pages of his book several warnings against plagiarism, and referred to laws, religions and scientific research methods. He does not allow anyone to cite anything more than two lines from his writings, and in the book he warns against bloggers who violate copyrights, associates them with international terrorism and other things, and claims he has written a reference on
scientific methodology. To top it all, he annexes ready-to-fill complaint forms against bloggers who publish pornography (fitting someone’s head over a naked body, an imaginary case with no history in Egypt’s blogs) and publicizing news that could tarnish the country’s reputation.

I do not really care much for copy rights, and think they are over-rated and keep knowledge, medicine, and soon genetically-engineered food from the world’s poorest, and I would not have written anything if this was another blogger, or a journalist, or even a university professor. What worries me, however, is that this is a judge whose ruling cannot be appealed. He can silence, imprison or execute people, and he oversees our elections.

Once the blogs are found offensive by the court, then in light of the Egyptian’s regime reputation, it is automatic to prosecute the bloggers. This is an early warning. We are still gathering information, and HRInfo should be making a release and starting procedure Saturday next. Hossam elHamalawy is posting in English. Follow him for updates.

Damn.

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Nick Douglas at the Huffington Post

In Journalism on November 30, 2006 at 11:52 pm

Nick Douglas (the guy who made Valleywag worth reading) has landed at the Huffington Post. He’ll be writing for the media blog Eat the Press. I subscribed to it.

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